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We help clients pursue their investment goals with sound financial strategies. You deserve a personal, tailored plan. Lasting, meaningful, and open relationships are the foundation of our practice. You’ve worked hard for your money and should feel confident with your investment choices as you make decisions for your financial future.
  • Insurance is valuable for employees and owners.
  • Owners get to retire, too.
  • You can begin planning now for retirement, selling your company, or the event of your death. 
Wells Fargo Advisors provides products and services, available through your Financial Advisor, that help you manage your assets and plan for the future. 

Customized products and services for business owners 

We are committed to helping you maximize the success and profitability of your business. Our specialized products and services can help give your business the cash flow and support it needs to thrive. 

Some of the services we offer and can assist with include: 

Employee benefit plans and packages

A competitive employee benefit package helps you attract and keep employees, regardless of the size of your company.  

Business owner life insurance

As a business owner, it’s important to consider both replacing the income your family depends on, and also providing funds to pay off business-related liabilities.  

Funding a buy-sell agreement

If your business has more than one owner, you need to understand the risks you may face if one of you dies unexpectedly. A buy-sell agreement sets up how ownership of the business may be transferred if one owner dies.

Key person life insurance

Proceeds from this type of business insurance can help offset the loss of sales your business would experience or expenses it may incur if a key person dies. 

Succession planning and business exit strategies

It can be helpful to start the succession planning and exit strategy process many years in advance. 

  • Selling a business: There are many options to consider in both the sale and how you will generate income after the sale.
  • Transferring the business to a family member. There are a variety of succession planning strategies you can use to transfer the business to a family member 
Read more about the business services we offer

Next steps 

  • Make an appointment with us to talk about your business needs.
  • Talk with your family or partners about insurance or succession planning.
  • Check the beneficiary designations on your financial and investment accounts.


Insurance products are offered through nonbank insurance agency affiliates of Wells Fargo & Company and are underwritten by unaffiliated insurance companies. Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC, a registered broker-dealer and non-bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company.
  • Developing your retirement income strategy is part of the Envision® process.
  • We can help you analyze possible expenses and sources of income.
  • Checking on your strategy annually can help you maintain course.

It starts with a plan

Creating a plan can help you stay focused, plan for challenges ahead, and make choices that work for you. 

Our Envision planning process is the foundation we use to develop your retirement income plan. It can help you make choices and tackle the following topics:
  • When and how can I retire with confidence?
  • How can I help make my money last as long as I’m retired?
  • Where will my income come from?
  • How do I prepare for and respond to events throughout retirement?
  • When and how should I address my legacy goals?
Read more about our Envision planning process and ask us about scheduling an appointment to discuss it. 

7 common retirement planning moves

Will the money in your investment accounts last through retirement? Here are some steps that go beyond the basics of using tax-advantaged funds and making regular contributions.
 
1. Monitor your portfolio 
Conduct regular investment checkups on your own and with us.

2. Maintain emergency savings
Wells Fargo Advisors recommends keeping an emergency fund with enough money to cover living expenses for three to six months. Keep emergency funds in a liquid account you can easily access if needed.
 
3. Set an appropriate asset allocation 
Investments are fluid. Some are more volatile, but all can be affected by market fluctuations. Adjust your assets to align with your current goals and tolerance for risk.

4. Itemize your income plan 
Understand where your retirement funds will come from. List out all sources, such as Social Security and pensions. For each item, list how it might generate income for your portfolio.
 
5. Clean up your accounts 
Consider consolidating accounts. You’ll not only have less paperwork, you can help keep an eye on your asset allocation and overall investment strategy.
 
We can talk about your choices and what might make the most sense for you. Before taking any action, speak with your current retirement plan administrator and tax professional.
 
6. Sell assets strategically
Selling assets can have tax implications. Proceeds could nudge you into a higher tax bracket. Balance the concern of minimizing taxes when you’re selling assets with your portfolio’s allocation strategy.
 
Talk with us about the choices you have in this situation.
 
7. Talk with family 
Partners and spouses should be on the same page regarding your financial portfolio. Cover some key financial details: 
    • Current total assets
    • How much you have saved right now
    • How much is in each account
    • Where the funds are located
    • Your budget
Part of your plan is how you spend your money – now and when you retire. Talk about it.

Get more details on these seven smart retirement planning moves

Common risks to address

While we develop your retirement plan, you’ll want to look at risks such as inflation, market events, health needs, withdrawal strategy, and how long you’re likely to live. Understanding the impact these challenges may have on your savings and planning for them can help you stay the course.
 
Read about five common retirement planning mistakes 

Have an ongoing process

Planning for retirement is not a “one and done” kind of activity. A good plan should be checked regularly and adjusted, as necessary. Keep an eye on your portfolio, talk about your expectations, and prepare for the unexpected.
 
Schedule an annual checkup with us to review your plans, your current circumstances, and your portfolio. We’ll work together to discuss your choices and what works for you.

Next steps 

  • Think about what you hope your retirement will be.
  • Write down all your possible sources of income and expenses in retirement.
  • Take a look at your portfolio and call us if you have any questions about changing your asset allocation.
  • Call us to start on your personalized retirement income plan.
 
Wells Fargo Advisors does not provide tax or legal advice. 
Investing involves risk including the possible loss of principal. Asset allocation cannot eliminate the risk of fluctuating prices and uncertain returns. Diversification does not guarantee profit or protect against loss in declining markets. Stocks offer long-term growth potential, but may fluctuate more and provide less current income than other investments. An investment in the stock market should be made with an understanding of the risks associated with common stocks, including market fluctuations. Dividends are not guaranteed and are subject to change or elimination.
  • Everyone could use an estate plan – not just the wealthy.
  • 5 documents are essential for many estate plans.
  • An estate planning attorney and your accountant will work with your Financial Advisor.

Estate planning: a matter of control 

You might associate estate planning with famous people you see in the news. In fact, estate planning could be appropriate for everyone. 

Consider your assets: bank accounts, investment accounts, 401(k) or 403(b) plan accounts, house, cars, jewelry, and heirlooms. This is your estate and your estate plan can define what you would like to happen to these assets when you die. 

An estate plan can also take care of you as you get older or if you become ill or incapacitated. Being wealthy has little to do with it. 

If you don’t make your own plan, your family may be left scrambling at an already difficult time. Bottom line: If you don’t decide, someone will decide for you.  

Five essential documents 

These five documents are often essential to an estate plan: 

Will - Instructions for distributing your assets when you die. You will name a personal representative (executor) to pay final expenses and taxes and distribute remaining assets. Name a guardian to raise your minor children if both parents die. 

Durable power of attorney – You give a trusted individual management power over your assets if you can’t manage them yourself. This document is effective only while you’re alive. 

Health care power of attorney - You choose someone to make medical decisions on your behalf if something were to happen and you can’t make them yourself. 

Living will – Shares your intentions about life-sustaining medical measures if you are terminally ill. No one is given authority to speak for you. 

Revocable living trust - You can provide for continued management of your financial matters while you are alive, after your death, and even for generations after. 

Find out more about the basics of estate plans

Why beneficiary designations are important

Beneficiary designations can be an easy way to transfer an account or insurance policy when you die. But if you didn’t complete beneficiary designations, or haven’t updated them, they can cause issues with your estate plan. 

Designations on forms are often filled out without much thought – but they’re important and deserve your attention. Beneficiary designations on forms like your insurance policy and 401(k) take priority over other estate planning documents, like your will or trust. 

Let’s say you specify in your will you want everything to go to your spouse after your death. But you never changed the beneficiary designation on your life insurance policy and it names your ex-spouse. Your ex may end up getting the proceeds. 

Find out where to look for beneficiary designations 

Turn to a team of professionals 

Making the decisions involved with estate planning may seem overwhelming. It doesn’t have to be. You can start by organizing your important documents. Get some tips here

Turn to a team of trusted professionals, including your financial advisor, an estate planning attorney, and your accountant. They know the questions to ask and can help you avoid potential pitfalls. 

If you currently don’t have relationships with an attorney and an accountant, we can make some recommendations. We can also discuss our role in the planning process and how you can get started. 

Next steps 

  • Make an appointment with us to talk about your estate planning goals.
  • Start gathering your financial documents.
  • Check the beneficiary designations on your financial and investment accounts.

Trust services available through banking and trust affiliates in addition to non-affiliated companies of Wells Fargo Advisors. 

Wells Fargo Advisors and its affiliate do not provide tax or legal advice. Please consult with your tax and/or legal advisors before taking any action that may have tax and/or legal consequences.
  • Your investments are important. Advisory Services can help them receive the care they deserve.
  • Your investments can be professionally managed or a Financial Advisor can help you manage them yourself.
  • Wells Fargo Advisors programs allow flexibility to help you reach your goals. 

Managing investments 

A lot may be riding on your investments: retirement, children’s or grandchildren’s education, your financial legacy. Your investment plan should get the attention it deserves. 

Some investors enjoy managing their own plan. They are confident in their abilities and have the time to research and monitor their investments’ performance. 

You’re not alone if you don’t fall into that category. Like many others, you may want to work with a professional by taking advantage of an advisory program. 

Using an advisory program 

You can save time and have the comfort of knowing a professional is managing your investments when you use the services of an advisory program. 

Advisory programs generally fall into two categories. One gives another party the power to make decisions for your account’s day-to-day management. This means you can allow a portfolio manager — in some cases your Financial Advisor — to decide when to buy, sell, and hold investments without consulting you. 

Your portfolio manager will make decisions based on a variety of factors: 
  • Your long-term objectives
  • The time you have to reach your objectives
  • Your risk tolerance 
In the other program, you collaborate with your Financial Advisor. We will provide you with objective advice and guidance based on your needs, goals, and today’s investment environment, to help you make your own buy, sell, and hold decisions. 

Fee replaces commissions 

So how can an advisory account differ from a traditional brokerage account? One difference is how you pay for the services you receive. In an advisory account program, you generally pay a fee. This is often charged on a quarterly basis based on a percentage of your account’s value. In a traditional brokerage account you would pay a commission for each transaction. 

Flexible range of alternatives 

You can choose which advisory services program you implement. Wells Fargo Advisors offers an array of programs. You can decide what products you would like to have managed, such as mutual funds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), stocks, bonds, and commodity-based investments. 

We can discuss the programs with you and see what fits your situation – and what makes you feel more confident in helping you reach your goals. 

Get more details on Advisory Services from Wells Fargo Advisors. 

Next steps

Decide if you would like some extra help with making your investment decisions.

Make an appointment to talk with us about advisory accounts.

The fees for advisory programs are asset-based and assessed quarterly in advance. There may be a minimum fee to maintain this type of account. Fees include advisory services, performance measurement, transaction costs, custody services, and trading. These fees do not cover the fees and expenses of any underlying exchange traded fund (ETF), closed-end funds, or mutual funds in the portfolio. Advisory accounts are not designed for excessively traded or inactive accounts and may not be suitable for all investors. Please carefully review the Wells Fargo Advisors advisory disclosure document for a full description of our services, including fees and expenses. The minimum account size for these programs is between $25,000 and $200,000.
  • If you were sick, injured or died, would your family have the resources to achieve their goals?
  • Help cover unpredictable financial risks through insurance.
  • Life, disability, and long-term care insurance help cover risks that could disrupt your investment plan.

Insurance helps protect assets 

You can’t avoid all risks in life. Insurance can play a key role in helping preserve your assets and achieve your financial goals. 

It’s all about keeping an eye on both assets and liabilities. Insurance allows you to transfer a risk from your balance sheet to an insurer’s.  Find out why we recommend insurance as part of your investment plan.

A different kind of risk 

When it comes to your financial goals, there are more risks to consider than just market volatility.  Insurance can help protect against life-changing events. It can help ensure the financial goals you have made can continue on.  

We offer life, disability and long-term care insurance to help protect what matters most to you.  Each type of coverage can help protect the key areas of your financial life: family, business, retirement, and legacy.  

  • Life Insurance - Life insurance helps protect the financial security of your family. Each type of life insurance is designed for a specific purpose. There is no “one size fits all”.  We offer a wide selection of life insurance products, all from highly rated insurance companies, to help meet your specific protection needs.
Life insurance falls into two main types; term or permanent. Term insurance covers a temporary need in your life, such as until your children are in college.

Permanent insurance provides lifelong coverage.  A key feature of many permanent insurance policies is the potential for it to accumulate cash value.  This, added with the unique tax treatment of life insurance, can help create a source of supplemental income during retirement or provide funds for other needs such as long-term care.  Permanent life insurance can also be a powerful tool when it comes to funding your legacy or charitable giving plans. 

Find out more about life insurance

  • Long-Term Care Insurance - This type of insurance can help pay for the costs of long-term care should you need it. It is important to know that Medicare does not pay the largest part of long-term care services or personal care—such as help with bathing, or for supervision often called custodial care. 
Extended care planning is a key component in any retirement income plan. It can help provide a source of income tax-free funds to pay for care, helping protect your retirement savings from the rising cost of care.

Find out more about long-term care insurance

  • Disability Insurance - Disability insurance is designed to replace a portion of your income if you're unable to work because of a sickness or injury. Even if you could weather a temporary gap in earnings, an extended disability can be financially devastating and put your other goals, such as retirement and college planning, at risk.

How much should I have? 

When it comes to the amount of coverage needed to help protect your financial goals, the “right” answer is unique to you. Factors such as your age, who depends on you, and your income and assets, should be carefully reviewed.  

Learn more about how much insurance you should have.

It’s important to understand the amount may change over time and when major life events occur, making a regular review is critical. Read more about the importance of insurance reviews.

Next Steps

  • Research the costs associated with skilled nursing care, adult day care, and other services.
  • Understand your annual expenses to help ensure you have the proper disability and life insurance coverage.
  • Evaluate how your needs may change over time.
  • Call us to see how insurance can play a role in your retirement planning.

Insurance products are offered through non-bank insurance agency affiliates of Wells Fargo & Company and are underwritten by unaffiliated insurance companies.

Guarantees are based on the claims-paying ability of the issuing insurance company.
  • Saving for your child’s or grandchild’s education doesn’t have to derail your retirement savings plan.
  • 529 plans and trust funds are designed to help save for a child’s education.
  • Financial aid and private loans may be other options.  

Retirement vs. education

As a parent or grandparent, you’re probably considering how to balance paying for college while planning for your retirement. Many families use some combination of savings, investments, borrowing, and financial aid (if available). 

There are options for financing college, but you can’t borrow for retirement. Wells Fargo Advisors believes  saving for retirement should be the higher priority for many investors. 

If your employer offers a 401(k) plan, consider putting your savings there first, especially if there is a company match. After that, contribute to your child’s education account. 

Save as early as possible

As you can imagine, the sooner you start saving for your child’s or grandchild’s education, the more money you may have later. 

One popular way to save is the 529 college savings plan. These are tax-advantaged accounts administered by states and institutions. Parents, grandparents, relatives, and friends can contribute.  

Other college savings accounts include custodial accounts in the child’s name and Coverdell Education Savings Accounts. 

Please consider the investment objectives, risk, charges and expenses carefully before investing in a 529 savings plan. The official statement, which contains this and other information, can be obtained by calling your Financial Advisor. Read it carefully before you invest. 

Read more about saving for a college education

Establish an educational trust fund 

Setting up an educational trust fund designed for your child’s education is also an option. When a grandparent or benefactor establishes an education trust, the terms of the trust can be specified. This can include who controls the money, how it will be used, and for whom the trust benefits. 

It’s a good idea for grandparents to involve parents when it comes to helping with college savings. How they choose to save could impact any potential financial aid the child may receive. 

Read more about funding your grandchild’s college education

Consider financial aid 

A variety of factors play into financial aid eligibility. Don’t assume your child or grandchild won’t qualify for financial aid.  

Start thinking about applying for aid during high school. Visit the U.S. Department of Education’s Financial Aid Office for information about eligibility requirements, application deadlines, and types of federal financial loans and aid. 

For nonfederal financial aid, visit the College Board’s College Scholarship Service (CSS)/Financial Aid PROFILE® application for information on qualifying. 

Go private 

Borrowing from a private lender is yet another option. Banks, credit unions, and other financial institutions provide private loans. Loans may be fixed or variable depending on the lender and the borrower’s credit rating. 

Other things to consider when borrowing from a private lender: 
  • Private loans are generally more expensive because they may have higher fees.
  • If the student takes out the private loan, the student is responsible for repayment.
  • A parent may be required to co-sign a loan.
  • Look for family relationship discounts, automatic payment discounts, and graduation benefits. 

Factor in income and existing investments
 

Other investment sources may help pay for college, and keep you from tapping your retirement savings. Those may include stocks, bonds, and mutual funds.

It’s a balancing act 

As you plan for the future, keep in mind the three C’s of college funding: consistency, communication, and compromise. 

Planning for retirement, managing your investment portfolio, and funding a college education is a balancing act. The trick is to plan ahead. 

We can help you come up with a plan that considers all aspects.

Next steps 

  • Ask us how you can save for both retirement and education.
  • Start saving for college when your child or grandchild is young.
  • Even if you don’t think you’ll qualify, apply for financial aid.

Trust services available through banking and trust affiliates in addition to non-affiliated companies of Wells Fargo Advisors. Wells Fargo Advisors and its affiliates do not provide legal or tax advice.