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Our Advisors are Fiduciaries

What does that mean?
Our experienced and credentialed advisors are required by law to always act in your best interest. No exceptions.

Our Portfolios are Custom

Actually custom.
We take a comprehensive approach to planning, which allows us to design a portfolio specifically suited to your personal financial situation considering income, tax bracket, retirement goals, estate plans, current assets, and more.

Our Results Aim to Control Risk

It's simple.
We seek to provide an effective, simple solution for our clients and pride ourselves on being an incredible resource and valuable advisor for our clients' portfolios.

  • Developing your retirement income strategy is part of the Envision® process.
  • We can help you analyze possible expenses and sources of income.
  • Checking on your strategy annually can help you maintain course.

It starts with a plan

Creating a plan can help you stay focused, plan for challenges ahead, and make choices that work for you. 

Our Envision planning process is the foundation we use to develop your retirement income plan. It can help you make choices and tackle the following topics:
  • When and how can I retire with confidence?
  • How can I help make my money last as long as I’m retired?
  • Where will my income come from?
  • How do I prepare for and respond to events throughout retirement?
  • When and how should I address my legacy goals? 

7 common retirement planning moves

Will the money in your investment accounts last through retirement? Here are some steps that go beyond the basics of using tax-advantaged funds and making regular contributions.
 
1. Monitor your portfolio 
Conduct regular investment checkups on your own and with us.

2. Maintain emergency savings
Wells Fargo Advisors recommends keeping an emergency fund with enough money to cover living expenses for three to six months. Keep emergency funds in a liquid account you can easily access if needed.
 
3. Set an appropriate asset allocation 
Investments are fluid. Some are more volatile, but all can be affected by market fluctuations. Adjust your assets to align with your current goals and tolerance for risk.

4. Itemize your income plan 
Understand where your retirement funds will come from. List out all sources, such as Social Security and pensions. For each item, list how it might generate income for your portfolio.
 
5. Clean up your accounts 
Consider consolidating accounts. You’ll not only have less paperwork, you can help keep an eye on your asset allocation and overall investment strategy.
 
We can talk about your choices and what might make the most sense for you. Before taking any action, speak with your current retirement plan administrator and tax professional.
 
6. Sell assets strategically
Selling assets can have tax implications. Proceeds could nudge you into a higher tax bracket. Balance the concern of minimizing taxes when you’re selling assets with your portfolio’s allocation strategy.
 
Talk with us about the choices you have in this situation.
 
7. Talk with family 
Partners and spouses should be on the same page regarding your financial portfolio. Cover some key financial details: 
    • Current total assets
    • How much you have saved right now
    • How much is in each account
    • Where the funds are located
    • Your budget
Part of your plan is how you spend your money – now and when you retire. Talk about it.

Common risks to address

While we develop your retirement plan, you’ll want to look at risks such as inflation, market events, health needs, withdrawal strategy, and how long you’re likely to live. Understanding the impact these challenges may have on your savings and planning for them can help you stay the course. 

Have an ongoing process

Planning for retirement is not a “one and done” kind of activity. A good plan should be checked regularly and adjusted, as necessary. Keep an eye on your portfolio, talk about your expectations, and prepare for the unexpected.
 
Schedule an annual checkup with us to review your plans, your current circumstances, and your portfolio. We’ll work together to discuss your choices and what works for you.

Next steps 

  • Think about what you hope your retirement will be.
  • Write down all your possible sources of income and expenses in retirement.
  • Take a look at your portfolio and call us if you have any questions about changing your asset allocation.
  • Call us to start on your personalized retirement income plan.
 
Wells Fargo Advisors does not provide tax or legal advice. 
Investing involves risk including the possible loss of principal. Asset allocation cannot eliminate the risk of fluctuating prices and uncertain returns. Diversification does not guarantee profit or protect against loss in declining markets. Stocks offer long-term growth potential, but may fluctuate more and provide less current income than other investments. An investment in the stock market should be made with an understanding of the risks associated with common stocks, including market fluctuations. Dividends are not guaranteed and are subject to change or elimination.
  • You can benefit from tax-advantaged investing in an IRA.
  • Consider contributing to an IRA even if you participate in an a qualified employer sponsored-retirement plan (QRP).
  • Find out which type of IRA – Traditional or Roth – is right for you.

IRAs can help you meet your retirement goals

Even if you already participate in a qualified employer sponsored-retirement plan (QRP) such as a 401(k), 403(b) or governmental 457(b), an IRA can help supplement these savings. Similar to a 401(k), IRAs offer the potential for growth in a tax-advantaged account. Over time, that can make a significant difference in your retirement savings.

Types of IRAs

Both Traditional and Roth IRAs offer tax advantages, a wide variety of investment options, the flexibility to choose whether or not to invest annually, and the same contribution limits. 

Traditional IRA - Offers tax-deferred growth potential. You pay no taxes on any investment earnings until you withdraw or “distribute” the money from your account, presumably in retirement.1 Additionally, depending on your income, your contribution may be tax deductiblePay taxes later. With a Traditional IRA your contributions may be tax-deductible and you’ll pay taxes when you make withdrawals in retirement.1 

Roth IRA – Offers tax-free growth potential. Earnings are distributed tax-free in retirement, if a five-year waiting period has been met and you are at least age 59½, or as a result of your death, disability, or using the first time homebuyer exception. Since contributions to a Roth IRA are made with after-tax dollars, there is no tax deduction regardless of income. 

Who can contribute to an IRA - You and your spouse, if filing jointly, can contribute to a Traditional IRA if you are under age 70½ and have earned income. You can make a non-deductible contribution to a Traditional IRA even if your income exceeds Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) deduction limits. You and your spouse, if filing jointly, can contribute to a Roth IRA at any age as long as you have earned income and are at or under MAGI phase-out limits.

Get more details on contributing to an IRA

Small business SIMPLE & SEP IRAs - SEP IRAs and SIMPLE IRAs are often offered by small businesses as a retirement plan for their employees. These plans can be ideal for small businesses with a few employees. A SEP IRA is a Traditional IRA that holds employer contributions under the SEP plan.2

IRA contribution limits and deadlines

IRS rules state how and by what date you can make your IRA contributions. IRA contributions must generally be made by April 15 for the prior tax year. If you are over 50, within a particular tax year, you can contribute an additional $1,000 catch-up amount each year. 

Call us to discuss the exact date for this year and the amount you can contribute, or check out IRS Publication 590 found here:

Retirement Plan Distribution Options.
When you change jobs or retire, you generally have four options for your retirement plan assets:
  1. Roll assets to an IRA
  2. Leave assets in your former employer’s plan, if the plan allows
  3. Move assets to your new/existing employer’s plan, if the plan allows
  4. Cash out through what’s called a “lump sum distribution,” pay taxes and perhaps a 10% IRS tax penalty
There are advantages and disadvantages to each option. The best one for you depends on your individual circumstances.3  Since your retirement plan savings may represent a substantial source of income in retirement it’s important to think about all of the following:  
  • The difference in fees and expenses between the QRP and IRA
  • When penalty-free distributions are available
  • Your need for help making investment decisions and other services offered
  • Any special considerations regarding your employer stock
  • Timing of required minimum distributions (RMDs)
  • Protection of assets from creditors and bankruptcy
We can sit down and look at your choices together so you can decide which one makes the most sense for you. Before you make any decision or take any action, speak with your current retirement plan administrator and tax professional.
 

Next steps

  • Make an appointment with us to go over your IRA choices.
  • Fund your IRA.
  • Find out if you can deduct your IRA contribution. 


1Traditional IRA distributions are generally taxed as ordinary income. Qualified Roth IRA distributions are federally tax-free provided a Roth account has been open for more than five years and the owner has reached age 59-1/2 or meets other requirements. Qualified Roth IRA distributions are not subject to state and local taxation in most states. Both may be subject to a 10% federal IRS tax penalty if distributions are taken prior to age 59-1/2. 
2Withdrawals are subject to ordinary income tax and may be subject to a federal 10% penalty if taken prior to age 59-1/2. For SIMPLE IRAs, the federal penalty increases to 25% if a distribution is taken prior to two years from the first deposit made into a participant’s account if under age 59-1/2. 
3Please keep in mind that rolling over assets to an IRA is just one of multiple options for your retirement plan. Each of the following options is different and may have distinct advantages and disadvantages.
  1. Roll assets to an IRA
  2. Leave assets in your former employer’s plan, if plan allows
  3. Move assets to your new/existing employer’s plan, if plan allows
  4. Cash out or take a lump sum distribution 
When considering rolling over assets from an employer plan to an IRA, factors that should be considered and compared between the employer plan and the IRA include fees and expenses, services offered, investment options, when penalty free withdrawals are available, treatment of employer stock, when required minimum distributions begin and protection of assets from creditors and bankruptcy. Investing and maintaining assets in an IRA will generally involve higher costs than those associated with employer-sponsored retirement plans. You should consult with the plan administrator and a professional tax advisor before making any decisions regarding your retirement assets.
  • Generally you have four distribution choices for your qualified employer–sponsored retirement plan (QRP) assets
  • Each has unique factors to keep in mind
  • Know all of your options before making a decision

Decide which option is right for you 


If you’re changing jobs or retiring, you’ll need to decide what to do with assets in your 401(k) or other qualified employer-sponsored retirement plan (QRP). These savings can represent a significant portion of your retirement income, so it’s important you carefully evaluate all of the options.   

Generally, you have four options:
  • Roll the assets to an Individual Retirement Account (IRA)
  • Leave the funds in your former employer’s retirement plan (if allowed)
  • Move savings to your new employer’s plan (if allowed)
  • Withdraw or “distribute” the money

Roll the assets to an IRA


Rolling your retirement savings to an IRA provides the following features:
  • Assets continue their tax-advantaged status and growth potential
  • You can continue to make annual contributions, if eligible
  • An IRA often gives you more investment options than are typically available in an employer’s plan
  • You also may have access to investment advice 

Before rolling your assets to an IRA consider the following: 
  • IRA fees and expenses are generally higher than those in your employer’s retirement plan
  • Loans from an IRA are prohibited
  • In addition to ordinary income, distributions prior to age 59 1/2 may be subject to a 10% IRS tax penalty
  • IRAs are subject to state creditor laws
  • If you own appreciated employer securities, favorable tax treatment of the net unrealized appreciation (NUA) is lost if rolled into an IRA

Leave the funds with your former employer 


You may be able to leave your retirement plan savings in your former employer’s plan, assuming the plan allows and you are satisfied with the investment options.  You will continue to be subject to the plan’s rules regarding investment choices, distribution options, and loan availability.  

Keeping assets in the plan features: 
  • Investments keep their tax-advantaged growth potential
  • You retain the ability to leave your savings in their current investments
  • You may avoid the 10% IRS early distribution penalty on withdrawals from the plan if you leave the company in the year you turn 55 or older (age 50 or older for certain public safety employees)
  • Generally, have bankruptcy and creditor protection
  • Favorable tax treatment may be available for appreciated employer securities owned in the plan

Move savings to your new employer’s plan 


If you’re joining a new company, moving your retirement savings to your new employer’s plan may make sense. This may be appropriate if:
  • You want to keep your retirement savings in one account
  • You’re satisfied with the investment choices offered by your new employer’s plan
This alternative shares many of the same advantages and considerations of leaving your money with your former employer. In addition, there may be a waiting period for enrolling in your new employer’s plan. Investment options are chosen by the QRP sponsor and you must choose from those options.

Withdraw or “distribute” the money 


Carefully consider all of the financial consequences before cashing out. The impact will vary depending on your age and tax situation.  Distributions prior to age 59 1/2 may be subject to both ordinary income taxes and a 10% IRS tax penalty. If you must access the money, consider withdrawing only what you need until you can find other sources of cash. 

Features 

  • You have immediate access to your retirement savings and can use however you wish.
  • Although distributions from the plan are subject to ordinary income taxes, penalty-free distributions can be taken if you turn:
    • Age 55 or older in the year you leave your company.
    • Age 50 or older in the year you stop working as a public safety employee (certain local, state or federal) — such as a police officer, firefighter, emergency medical technician, or air traffic controller — and are taking distributions from a governmental defined benefit pension or governmental defined contribution plan. Check with the plan administrator to see if you are eligible.
  • If you own employer securities, a distribution may qualify for the favorable tax treatment of NUA.
Keep in mind

  • Your former employer is required to withhold 20% of your distribution for federal taxes.
  • Distribution may be subject to federal, state and local taxes unless rolled over to an IRA or another employer plan within 60 days.
  • Your investments lose their tax-advantaged growth potential.
  • Your retirement may be delayed, or the amount you’ll have to live on later may be reduced.
  • Depending on your financial situation, you may be able to access a portion of your funds while keeping the remainder saved in a retirement account. This can help lower your tax liability while continuing to help you save for your retirement. Ask your plan administrator if partial distributions are allowed.
  • If you leave your company before the year you turn 55 (or age 50 for public service employees), you may owe a 10% IRS tax penalty on the distribution.

What to consider if you own company stock


Net unrealized appreciation (NUA) is defined as the difference between the value at distribution of the employer security in your plan and the stock’s cost basis. The cost basis is the original purchase price paid within the plan. Assuming the security has increased in value, the difference is NUA.  NUA of employer securities received as part of an eligible lump-sum distribution from an employer retirement plan qualifies for special tax treatment. In most cases, NUA will be available only for lump-sum distributions — partial distributions do not qualify.

We can help educate you so you can decide which option makes the most sense for your specific situation.

Next steps

  • Learn about your choices before taking a distribution
  • Pay special attention to taxes, penalties and fees associated with each action
  • Contact us or your  tax professional if you have questions about how to proceed


When considering rolling over assets from an employer plan to an IRA, factors that should be considered and compared between the employer plan and the IRA include fees and expenses, services offered, investment options, when penalty free distributions are available, treatment of employer stock, when required minimum distributions begin, protection of assets from creditors, and bankruptcy. Investing and maintaining assets in an IRA will generally involve higher costs than those associated with employer-sponsored retirement plans. You should consult with the plan administrator and a professional tax advisor before making any decisions regarding your retirement assets. Withdrawals are subject to ordinary income tax and may be subject to a federal 10% penalty if taken prior to age 59 1/2. 
Wells Fargo Advisors does not provide tax or legal advice. Please consult with your tax and legal advisors to determine how this information may impact your own situation.
  • Our Envision process can help you plan your investments around your most important life goals and dreams.
  • Your plan’s flexibility lets you monitor and adjust your goals and investments as your life changes.
  • You can “test-drive” goals to find out how they’ll play out within your plan. 

Planning with a Financial Advisor 

We’re not the typical investment firm. Instead of looking for a particular dollar amount as a retirement target, our approach to financial advice starts with your life goals. 

Get more details on the Envision process.

Once we’ve have helped you explore your goals and dreams, we’ll create an investment plan together to support them. 

Our innovative Envision® planning process helps us keep you on track toward the future you’re planning. Our process is flexible, so we can easily review and update your plan if your goals or circumstances change. 

So much more than an investment plan 

“Investment planning” can sometimes seem like cookie-cutter investment mixes and generalizations. Although it’s better than nothing, it’s impersonal and vague. 

The Envision process does more. 

Our process is a life planning tool that helps us work as a team with you to: 
  • Explore your life goals
  • Plan your investments around benchmarks that hold real meaning to you
  • Track your progress toward achieving them 

Best of all, it gives us the tools you need to: 
  • Decide on an appropriate investment strategy
  • Monitor your progress
  • Re-sync — or rethink — your approach whenever necessary

Put a process behind your plans 

When you work with one of our Financial Advisors, the conversation starts by exploring your big-picture plans, hopes, and dreams. With the help of our unique Envision Priority Cards, you and your advisor will prioritize your goals for the future and map out a financial course to help you achieve them. 

Your Envision plan can take into account: 
  • Life goals
  • Education goals
  • Assets
  • Liabilities
  • Cash-flow requirements
  • Retirement planning needs
  • Levels of acceptable investment risk
  • Asset allocation objectives 

Setting and prioritizing goals 

Because the Envision process is flexible, you can “test-drive” goals to find out how they’ll play out within your plan. 

Putting your plan in motion 

Once you’ve penciled in your goals, the Envision process can help us recommend a plan (including an asset allocation) that supports your objectives. We can “stress test” your investment portfolio through statistical modeling when you modify a goal. 

As you go forward, the Envision process makes it easy to keep track of your progress and realign your investment plan when necessary. 

Life events might call for adjustments to your Envision plan: 
  • Marriage or divorce
  • Birth or death
  • Increasing medical costs
  • Helping a child or grandchild afford higher education
  • Caring for an elderly parent
  • Starting a new or second career
  • Inheriting money or other assets 

It’s about you and your path forward 

At Wells Fargo Advisors, we’ve built one of the nation’s premier investment firms around a deep respect for planning. Our commitment to helping you plan effectively, invest wisely, and map a realistic course to your future is nowhere more evident than in our Envision process. 

Get more details on the Envision process.  

Next steps 

  • Decide if you’re ready to put a plan and process behind your investment portfolio.
  • Start thinking about the life goals you’d most like to invest toward.

IMPORTANT: The projections or other information generated by Envision regarding the likelihood of various investment outcomes are hypothetical in nature, do not reflect actual investment results and are not guarantees of future results. Results may vary with each use and over time.


Services

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Retirement Planning

It’s easy to put off retirement planning. But the earlier you start planning, the longer and more enjoyable your retirement may be. Do you already have a retirement plan? When can you retire? Will you have enough money to enjoy your retirement? We can help you determine if you are still on track.
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Trust and Estate Planning

Safeguarding your assets for future generations and providing a thoughtful and meaningful legacy are part of the estate planning process. Together, your Presidio Group Wealth Management Team and Wells Fargo Advisors can provide you investment management capabilities and trust expertise.
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Investment Management

With a comprehensive understanding of your objectives, we will design a plan that lets you sleep at night and not worry about day-to-day investment changes. We work with you to identify your risk tolerance and recommend a portfolio model to help you achieve specific financial goals, from your working years, straight through to retirement. We believe in transparency, logic and diversification.
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Custom Services

Our team of experts can help advise on your specific situation and would be happy to talk about what that may look like. Contact us today to start discussing your specific needs and goals.

Our Process

Understanding Our Clients
We begin by working with you to define your priorities, clarify your goals, and determine your tolerance for risk.

Develop a Plan
We design a comprehensive investment plan based on your information, tolerance for risk, goals, and objectives.

Implement the Plan
We thoroughly review the investment plan with you and begin implementation based on an agreed upon timeline.

Review and Update the Plan
We continually review the status of your investment plan, including asset allocation, and investment performance. In addition we update your plan to accommodate changes in your circumstances.